Call me Ishmael

I have been on a literary odyssey, across the salty spray of the high seas and deep into the finely dissected belly of a beast.

The Moby Dick Big Read is a bold and inspiring online project developed at Plymouth University. It has been an omnipresent part of my existence for 135 days.

The problem: Herman Melville’s classic novel is a seemingly inaccessible tome which is unattractive to most mere-mortal readers.

The aim: to bring this leviathan to the masses Continue reading

The India Book Blog

I’ve been quiet on the blogging front lately, too busy eating, holidaying and writing other less pleasurable pieces!  I’ve also been reading plenty and its time to share some of that with you.  For my trip to India, I researched and read as much literature as I could.  Here are my recommendations:

A Passage to India by E M Forster.  The quintessential colonial classic was my kindle companion during my own passage through India.  Despite making me feel embarrassed to be British at times, it is cleverly derisive of the upper classes romping their way through foreign lands whilst keeping their minds firmly shut to alternative cultures.  Witty and perfectly composed, this was more enjoyable than Forster’s other works for me.

Life of Pi by Yann Martel. I didn’t realise this popular novel, another Booker winner, was about India until I started reading it. Whilst technically located all-adrift on the ocean waves, it is a very Indian novel in style and in its sense of drama.  The main character is raised at the Pondicherry Zoo on the south-east coast of India.  The plot centres on his shipwrecked adventure aboard a lifeboat he shares with Mr Richard Parker, the Bengal Tiger.  Surreal, symbolic and summing up with a twist, it is justifiably popular.

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